Dr. Theodor Seuss Geisel

Dr. Theodor Seuss Geisel

Dr. Theodor Seuss Geisel contributed many cartoon editorials during the early stages of war between 1941-1943.

Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel, 1904-1991), known for his childrens books is often over-looked as a pivitol artist prior and during the beginnings of United States involvement in the war. For two years, 1941-1943, he was the chief editorial cartoonist for the New York newspaper PM, and for that journal he drew over 400 editorial cartoons that depicted the likes of Hitler and Mussolini. His cartoons also provided commentary on U.S. isolationism and how U.S. citizens can contribute to the war effort through war bonds.

Seuss’s drawings had brought a lot of criticisms of how the United States had handled isolationism. He often compared the America First movement to being just as bad as Nazism, fascism, and communism. He was very critical on how the United States would, as he seen, allow Germany, Japan, and Italy to be so aggressive. Seuss often made Charles Lindburgh, Gerald Nye, and Charles Coughlin subject of his cartoons as anti-Semitic traitors that were comparable to Nazis. Seuss had believed that the United States was not sending enough aid to Britain and France. With that said, Seuss was very supportive of President Roosevelt’s handling of fighting the war and going to Europe first.

Dr. Theodor Seuss Geisel